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Why All-Girls?

In an all-girls school, the students collaborate, lead, mentor, and learn from each other. The faculty has developed rich curricula and practices pedagogy based on research that shows how girls learn best. A girl occupies every role: every part in the play, every club leader, every position on every team. Not only does she have a wealth of avenues for self-exploration and development, she will develop strong, life-long friendships, and will be a part of a community that lasts a lifetime.

Lower School girl  
Graduation
Field DayStone Ridge excels at shaping and forming bright, motivated, gracious, and talented young women. The following research and data points show that in a learning environment free of gender stereotyping, girls will flourish.


Video produced by National Coalition of Girls’ Schools (NCGS)

Academic Engagement

  • 35% of women graduates of Catholic single-sex schools report spending more hours per week studying or doing homework, compared to 24% of Catholic coeducational graduates.
  • Students from single-sex schools are more likely to engage in group study. Within Catholic schools, this difference is 40% for Catholic single-sex graduates versus 34 percent of Catholic coeducational graduates.
  • Single-sex graduates report more time talking with teachers outside of class, especially in the independent school sector, where 37% of single-sex graduates reported spending three or more hours per week meeting with teachers apart from class, compared to 30% among women graduates of independent coeducational schools.
  • Additional evidence of peer-based academic engagement is seen in the finding that nearly two-thirds or 65% of women graduates of independent single-sex schools report frequently or occasionally tutoring other students in high school, compared with 58% among women who attended independent coeducational schools.
Source: 1

Self-Confidence

  • 81% of women graduates of independent single-sex schools rate themselves "above average" or in the "highest 10 percent" for academic ability, compared to 75% of women graduates of independent coeducational schools.
  • Nearly 60% of women graduates of independent single-sex schools rate themselves "above average" or in the "highest 10 percent" with regard to intellectual self-confidence, compared to 54% of their independent coeducational school counterparts.
  • 64% of women graduates of independent single-sex schools rate their writing ability "above average" or in the "highest 10 percent" compared to 59% of independent coeducational school graduates.
  • 45% of women graduates of independent single-sex schools rate their public speaking ability "above average" or in the "highest 10 percent," compared to 39% of women graduates of independent coeducational schools.
Source: 1

Higher SAT Scores

Women who attended single-sex schools tended to outscore their coeducational counterparts on the SAT. Mean SAT composite scores (Verbal plus Math) are 43 points higher for single-sex graduates within the independent school sector, and 28 points higher for single-sex alumnae in the Catholic school sector.

Source: 1


Girls Take Academic Risks

"As a college professor, I could identify students from girls' schools with a 90 percent accuracy rate on the first day of class. They were the young women whose hands shot up in the air, who were not afraid to defend their positions, and who assumed that I would be interested in their perspectives." (Robin Robertson, Ph.D.)

Girls are Leaders

84% of recent girls’ school graduates give their schools top marks for providing leadership opportunities. Additionally, 93 percent agreed that girls’ schools provide greater leadership opportunities than coed schools and 80% had held leadership positions since graduating from high school.

Source: 4

Confidence in Math and Computers

  • 48% of female graduates of independent single-sex schools rate their math ability "above average" or in the "highest 10 percent" compared to 37% of independent coeducational graduates.
  • 36% of women graduates of independent single-sex schools rate their computer skills in the highest categories, compared to 26% of women graduates of independent coeducational schools.

Greater Interest in Engineering Careers

Women graduates of single-sex schools are three times more likely than their coeducational peers to state they intend to pursue a career in engineering (4.4% versus 1.4%).

Greater Political Engagement

Female graduates of single-sex schools are more likely than their coeducational counterparts to discuss politics in class and with friends. Political engagement is strong at Catholic schools, where 43% of women graduates of single-sex institutions report that it is "very important" or "essential" for them to keep up to date with political affairs, compared to 36% of women graduates of Catholic coeducational schools.

Souce: 1

Co-Curricular Engagement

Women graduates of single-sex schools are more likely than their coeducational counterparts to report that there is a very good chance they will participate in student clubs or groups while they are in college (70% anticipate involvement, in campus organizations, compared to 60% of coeducational alumnae).

Source: 1

Graduate School

Women who attended single-sex schools are slightly more likely than those who attended a coeducational school to say that they are going to college to prepare for graduate school (71% to 66%) and to choose a college because its graduates are admitted to top graduate schools (45% to 41%).

Source: 1

Resources

Additional Resources

NCGS

How Girls Thrive
JoAnn Deak, Ph.D.
How girls thrive
       Girls on the Edge
Leonard Sax, MD
Sax book

 

 

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